The Catholic University of America

Viewing by month: October 2009

Oct 23 2009

The debate over health care reform

The debate over health care reform, though at times uninformed and uncivilized, has again focused attention on the longstanding issue of government’s proper role in a (predominantly) market economy.  It is not my intent to address this issue per se except to admit without apology that I am a firm believer in and strong proponent of private markets.  (...) When the issue is narrowed to the proper role of government in the provision of health care, however, serious complications arise that the market, without broader government involvement, cannot resolve...

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4 comments - Posted by Ernest Zampelli at 4:04 PM - Categories: Economy | Social Justice | Government & Civil Society

Oct 19 2009

Democracy’s Children: Engaging Young People in Civic Life

Scholars and pundits bemoan young people’s lagging participation in politics (only a minority vote), disinterest in following the daily news (an even tinier minority read the newspaper), and disappointing scores on tests of civic knowledge and American history (the majority fall into the “inadequate” group).  Downward trends began in the early 1970s and reached new lows around 2000.  The events of 9/11, Katrina, and conscious mobilization of the youth vote in 2004, sparked a upward shift which continued through 2008 presidential campaign and election. It is too early to say whether the data foretell a turnaround...

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2 comments - Posted by James Youniss at 10:00 AM - Categories: Education | Government & Civil Society

Oct 19 2009

Atop Impressive Shoulders

It's with much delight that I write to inaugurate the Institute's blog. This comes at the moment in which we have renamed ourselves. Formerly, the Life Cycle Institute, we are now the Institute for Policy Research & Catholic studies. The blog is offered as a venue to share insights from the research of our Fellows and reflections on that research's significance.  What we hope to achieve is scholarly discourse that both enriches and hones our on-going work.  A moderated blog, our aim is...

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0 comments - Posted by Stephen Schneck at 9:55 AM - Categories: